Archive

Urban Planning (Portfolio)

Here’s a first run at a poster I made trying to simplify Germany in order to memorize the provinces and the capital cities. I learned a while ago that maps are more understandable when corners and lines (or complex shapes) are minimized, so I used only 90 and 45 degree angles and simplified shapes and fonts. The map is part of a 1-poster-a-day project I’m trying to do over the next 100 days.

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In the last few months I’ve been working with social scientist, Christine Prieser here in Berlin who’s work focuses on the function of bouncers (Türsteher) in the world of the night. Her work is extremely interesting and I was of course interested in getting involved in some way.

Together we dreamed up 168 Hours Berlin-Friedrichshain. In this project we sought to examine the nature of time in the city. Our ultimate goal would be to show how the city morphs through time, and that the space of the city is never constant. We starting on this exploration by examining what spaces could be entered and accessed from public space through a typical week.

In order to do this, we collected data on all of the street-level building uses throughout a section of the Berlin neighbourhood of Friedrichshain. Going door to door, we coded the each entrance to see what spaces could be entered. We collected information about the use, opening times, and form of entrance and then used this data to show how Friedrichshain opens and closes through 168 hours (the number of hours in a week). In cases where opening times were not displayed, we estimated them based on similar uses. Below are a sample of maps at selected times of the week, showing where one can enter, where each dot is an enterable space.

Map 1 - Monday Map 2 - Wednesday Map 3 - Friday Map 4 - Saturday

This is an ongoing project, and we hope to hone our analysis in the near future. Particularly important is the question of access, since access is different for different people. A space may be open, but it may not be welcoming, and certain spaces are selective to certain groups of people. Central to our analysis are critiques of the dichotomy of ‘day and night’, as well as the overarching focus of the disciplines of Planning, Geography and Civil Engineering on general daily patterns (i.e., the 9-5 work day).

TeTo

If you are in Toronto and would like to see a small showcase of my Berlin work, head over to the Goethe Institute during their library hours. Starting on Thursday, January 15th, a number of my Berlin works for Texture/Tone will be set up. More details: http://www.goethe.de/ins/ca/tor/ver/en13748856v.htm

As well, if you’re around on Friday February 27th at 5:30pm, I’ll be giving a talk about Berlin’s streetscape and demonstrating TeTo, the texture-to-sound translator I built while in Berlin. More details: http://www.goethe.de/ins/ca/tor/ver/en13749462v.htm

 

 

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As part of my work on the Toronto Ward Boundary Review Project at the Canadian Urban Institute, I developed a number of maps illustrating the four Community Councils of Toronto – Etobicoke-York, North York, Scarborough, and Toronto-East York. Displayed in public meetings consulting on the present location of Toronto’s municipal ward boundaries, these maps provided needed context to the discussion of where to draw lines, including major transit stations, road and rail networks, green spaces, shorelines population projections and the present ward boundaries.

With this work, I was responsible for a complete data and design process from population data analysis, through GIS layer creation and collection, to final design, proofing and printing. For more information on the project, see the project website.

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As part of my work on the Toronto Ward Boundary Review Project at the Canadian Urban Institute, I developed a number of maps illustrating population data, housing data and ward and riding boundaries. Displayed in public meetings consulting on the present location of Toronto’s municipal ward boundaries, these maps provided needed context to the discussion of where to draw boundaries. Building a streamlined and focused design theme while also paying attention to data accuracy and information communication were important aspects of this work.

With this work, I was responsible for a complete data and design process from population data analysis, through GIS layer creation and collection, to final design, proofing and printing. For more information on the project, see the project website.

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This map shows the laneways of Toronto against a dark background, modeled after some of the other laneway maps showing up in Toronto right now. Taking the idea further, I calculated the network of streets that connect to laneways to visualize the accessibility of laneways to the city.

The first map shows just the laneways, while the second shows the laneway connected to their nearest part of the street network. The network fades to dark as it spreads away from the laneway.

While the overwhelming majority of laneways are downtown, small oases pop out of some of the most obscure locations throughout the city. Try to find your own place in the larger-scale maps below.

(Map 1. Laneways of Toronto)

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(Map 2. Laneways with connecting roads)

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In collaboration with the Madeline Collective, I produced a proposal for altering part of Toronto’s public space. The proposal, entitled Upstream/Downstream, focuses on the pedestrian tunnel between Front Street and the Lakeshore. The site was chosen as it is a major throughway for pedestrians exiting Union Station and headed to the Air Canada Centre, the Toronto Islands and the businesses along Queens Quay.

In the site, we proposed to project underwater imagery, making use of the natural sound of rushing from cars as a cognate of rushing water. With this we hoped to transform this space which was deemed ugly, unpleasant and unnerving into something remarkable, curious and interesting as well as building a visual connection between the tunnel pedestrians’ major destination – Lake Ontario.  

The proposal was part of the NXTCITY Competition, held in Toronto in July 2014.

Download the Upstream Downstream Brief  (PDF, 11,6 MB)